What You—And Only You—Can Take Responsibility For

I just wrote a guest post about accountability for the TDS Business blog that broached the subject from the standpoint of how to be accountable for getting Finger pointing at youthings done in your business. As a self-employed small business owner, you don’t have a boss breathing down your neck, formal performance reviews, or a structured monetary award incentive to motivate you. It’s all you.

 

But besides the down and dirty business stuff, there’s another thing you need to hold yourself accountable for. YOU are the only person with ultimate responsibility for it.

 

Taking care of yourself. Physically. Mentally.

 

And your success in doing so hinges a great deal on managing stress.

 

Stress Sucks.

According to statistics provided by the American Psychological Association and American Institute of Stress (which I found on the American Institute of Stress website), 77 percent of people in the U.S. regularly experience physical symptoms caused by stress. And 73 percent experience psychological symptoms because of stress.

 

That’s nearly all of us. Rather astounding and unnerving, don’t you think? But it’s a little reassuring, too. If you’ve felt the effects of stress like I have, it’s sort of nice to know we’re not alone. We’re not the only ones who have dealt with the ramifications of letting stuff get to us:

 

  • Tightened neck muscles
  • Nervousness and inability to relax
  • Never a good night’s sleep
  • Headaches
  • Moodiness
  • Upset stomach and wacked out digestion
  • No energy

 

The list goes on.

 

Unfortunately, there’s not always a way to eliminate the work and home pressures that add stress to our lives. But the one thing we can do is take responsibility for prepping our bodies and minds to deal with stress more effectively.

 

The Stress-Busting Trio

I’m not a doctor, psychologist, nutritionist, or any other variety of health and wellness expert, so I’m not going to tell you what you should do. But I know what it’s like to have competing priorities and to feel the overwhelming pressure of trying to get everything done (and done “right”). So I thought I’d share some thoughts on what helps me keep stress levels under control in hopes it will help you explore ways to manage stress better.

 

I’ve found my success at dealing with stress depends largely on how attentive I am to three things.

 

  • Exercising
    I’ve been working out for over thirty years and can’t imagine how much of a frazzled mess I’d be if I didn’t get that boost of endorphins that comes from some physical exertion and sweat. Exercise helps reduce anxiety and improve mood and sleep. And then there’s the side benefit of getting fit and feeling better about yourself.
    Now that I work from home, I find it more manageable and mentally beneficial to break my workouts into smaller chunks and do them throughout the day rather than doing a single longer workout.

    According to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, I seem to be on the right track with that approach, “Studies have found that people who spend more time each day watching television, sitting, or riding in cars have a greater chance of dying early than people who spend less time on their duffs. Researchers speculate that sitting for hours on end may change peoples’ metabolism in ways that promote obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and other chronic conditions.”

    As solopreneurs and small business owners, we typically do a lot of work at our desks or sitting in a sedentary state somewhere. In addition to refreshing our minds, fitting in breaks to get our bodies moving could help us keep some potential health issues at bay.

    Not sure you have the discipline to do it? Consider getting one of those fitness bands like the Vivofit (that’s the one I have), that tracks your steps throughout the day and raises the equivalent of a red flag whenever you’ve been planted on your behind for an extended period of time.

 

  • Eating Smart
    “You are what you eat.” I’ve found that to be true. Certain foods can trigger and aggravate stress, particularly processed foods like soft drinks, fast food, microwave and out-of-the-box meals that are pretty much void of nutrients and full of sugar, sodium, and additives.

    I notice a big difference in my ability to concentrate and to deal with challenges when I stray from eating whole foods and indulge in quick convenience foods instead. There’s plenty of evidence to support that food plays an important role in regulating cortisol (the stress hormone) levels. That gives us very good reason to eat wisely.

 

  • Sleeping Enough
    It’s a vicious, frustrating cycle; stress can interfere with your sleep and not getting enough sleep can make you feel more stressed. According to the National Sleep Foundation’s recommendations, adults from 26 – 64 years old should get between 7 and 9 hours of sleep each day.

    Hands down, sleep (or lack of it) is the one thing above all else that can make or break my day.

 

It’s a Package Deal

All of the above don’t work as well alone as they do together—at least not in my experience. Eating better makes me feel more energetic when exercising, and exercise facilitates better sleep at night, and better sleep at night makes me more inclined to exercise.

 

My outlook, energy level, and productivity are all more optimal when I make the trio of exercise, eating well, and sleep a priority. And only I can hold myself responsible for doing those things.

 

How accountable have you been for managing stress and taking better care of yourself? It’s not always easy when you’re schedule is jam-packed and you’re pulled in multiple directions. But remember, if you don’t do it. No one else will do it for you.

 

As I finished this post, by friend, client, mastermind group colleague, and all-around savvy small business owner Rachel Strella posted an article reminding us how important it is to take time for ourselves. Check it out!

By Dawn Mentzer

Image courtesy of stockimages at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

 

 

 

“Recognition is the greatest motivator”—Fortune Cookie Friday Small Biz Wisdom

What motivates you to do your best?

 

You know, the thing that kicks you in the pants and makes you want to trudge onward in your small business despite setbacks, exhaustion, and naysayers?Fortune Cookie Fortune

 

Is it the lure of the dollar bill? Is it the satisfaction of building something from the ground up?

 

Is it recognition?

 

For the most part, I think this week’s fortune, “Recognition is the greatest motivator,” rings true for many solopreneurs and small business owners.

 

When I started out as a freelance writer in 2010, making big bucks wasn’t what drove me the most. Yes, I wanted to succeed. But as a realist, the financial component didn’t monopolize my thoughts. I certainly wanted to earn respectable income writing, but first and foremost, I aspired to become recognized in the market as a writer worth hiring.

 

Most startup business owners I know are driven by the desire to gain the confidence of their customers and prospective customers. They know that by delivering exceptional services and products, their businesses will grow and evolve. Increased recognition and respect (which leads to incrementally increasing financial success) drives them.

 

Dreams of fame and fortune might serve as the primary motivator for some of us, but most of us are a bit more professionally pragmatic. We realize aspiring for recognition is Step 1. The rest will follow over time, with patience, and after a lot of hard work.

 

Your turn! What motivates you to push forward in your business?

By Dawn Mentzer (a.k.a. The Insatiable Solopreneur™)

Common Sense Tips For Using Humor In Your Blog Posts

We all love to laugh. But our individual tastes in humor vary—often considerably.Man laughing hard

Think about it. You’ve probably encountered moments when…

  • you laughed hysterically at a punch line on a sitcom, while your significant other managed a quiet and solitary, “Ha.”
  • you and a friend compared notes on the latest big screen comedy, and your reviews weren’t exactly in sync.
  • you cracked a one-liner that had you doubled over and in tears while those around you remained unamused.

As awkward as a mismatched sense of humor can be on a personal level, it can create reader perception problems for your business if you’re not careful when attempting to infuse laughs into your blog content.

How Can You Keep Your Attempts At Humor In Your Blog From Falling Flat?

My latest guest post on the TDS Biz Blog shares why humor is a slippery slope and how you can maintain your footing when incorporating it into your posts.


By Dawn Mentzer (a.k.a. The Insatiable Solopreneur™)

Image courtesy of stockimages at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Fortune Cookie Friday Small Biz Wisdom: Do You Dare?

What a fine specimen for this Fortune Cookie Friday’s nugget of takeout wisdom.Fortune Cookie Friday: Dare

 

 Fortune sides with him who dares.”

 

As solopreneurs and small business owners, we constantly meet opportunity. And with it, we face uncertainty and risk.

 

Going into business for yourself in and of itself stands as the perfect example of how opportunity, uncertainty, and risk are intertwined. To reap the rewards of opportunities, you sometimes need to put yourself out there and expose yourself to the possibility of not succeeding.

 

It’s scary. But, “Fortune sides with him who dares.”

 

To start and grow a business, you must dare to take some chances. If you don’t, you’ll find yourself at a severe disadvantage.

 

By “dare,” I mean you have to exit your comfort zone more than you care to.

 

Otherwise, you likely won’t:

 

  • Find as many potential clients.
  • Discover new ways to expand your offerings.
  • Learn crucial new business technology tools.
  • Significantly hone your skills and knowledge.

 

Don’t dare and you will get left behind and lost in the shuffle.

 

Do you dare…

 

  • Go to a networking function where you’ll know no one?
  • Talk with a competitor to see if you might form a collaborative partnership to serve more clients?
  • Invest dollars in a social media management tool?
  • Fly across the country to attend training?

 

True, there’s always the risk things won’t work out as well as you hope they will. But fortune favors those who dare with new perspectives—and new opportunities.

 

What have you dared to do lately to better your business? Dare to share it here!

 

By Dawn Mentzer (a.k.a. The Insatiable Solopreneur™)

Why Being A “Solopreneur” Is B.S.

I can already see the angry mob of freelancers and one-person business owners with pitchforks and flaming torches rounding the corner in protest. Solopreneur

 

But before you stick it to me, I hope you’ll stick with me and read on.

 

How Do You Define “Solopreneur”?

Surprisingly, Urban Dictionary has a straightforward, no-nonsense description:

 

“An entrepreneur who works alone, ‘solo,’ running their business single-handedly. They might have contractors for hire, yet have full responsibility for the running of their business.”

 

It’s that second part of the definition and its contrariness to the first part that has me thinking we might sometimes apply the wrong mindset to our solo businesses.

 

We Do Very Little “Solo” as Solopreneurs

The phrase, “It takes a village to raise a child,” applies in some way to us as solopreneurs, too. We’re adults, of course, but our businesses are constantly evolving. They have to or they won’t survive.

 

We’re faced with ever-changing…

  • Technology for communicating, collaborating, and executing administrative tasks.
  • Client needs.
  • Competitive pressures.
  • Economic conditions.
  • Tax and accounting laws.
  • Business regulations.
  • Personal and professional highs and lows.

 

I guess if you’re a super solopreneur you can leap tall buildings and keep up with all of it on your own, but the rest of us need help from a variety of other people and businesses.

 

We learn to do business better with the help of…

 

  • Tax specialists – You might not need a CPA, but a professional tax preparer can ensure you’re following the rules and not missing out on any deduction opportunities.
  •  

  • Lawyers – Tip: I have membership to LegalShield Pre-Paid Legal Services which, for a low monthly fee, gives me access to an attorney whenever I have legal questions. You might want to check it out.
  •  

  • Bookkeeping specialists – While I retain my own books in Quickbooks Online, I had an expert help me set up my company accounts and every few months I schedule time with her for a checkup. She usually finds one or two things I should have entered differently. If you’re keeping your own books, how confident are you that all is correct?
  •  

  • Business advisors – You can save yourself from going down a wrong path by simply tapping into the honesty and experience of other professionals. Whether through a formal mentoring program, mastermind group, or by simply turning to someone you respect and trust, you can get affirmation and avoid pitfalls by sharing your challenges and asking for advice.
  •  

  • Competitors – You heard me correctly. None of us can serve everyone. Not all clients or projects are the right fit for us. I value my relationships with other writers for many reasons. Among them, the ability to refer prospects to someone else who has the capabilities and capacity to take on projects that I cannot.
  •  

  • Project partners – As a freelance writer, I alone can’t always serve a client’s needs. Sometimes they need website design or print design work in addition to the content I produce. You’ve probably encountered similar situations in your business. We sometimes need professionals in complementary fields to fill voids in projects.
  •  

  • An Assistant – I realize not all solopreneurs will either be able to afford one or absolutely need one, but a helping hand can alleviate some administrative pressures. When your amount of billable work for clients has expanded and you find it difficult to keep up with other business tasks, you might consider an independent virtual assistant to help you. My assistant, Rose, has been helping me since March of this year with research, proofreading, and other odds and ends. I don’t know how I managed without her. With her help, I don’t feel pulled in as many directions,  and I’m better able to focus.

 

Striving For Success as a Solopreneur: Don’t Go It Alone

So while you and I call ourselves “solopreneurs,” we depend an awful lot on others. I don’t really believe being a solopreneur is B.S., but we should never lose sight of how much easier we can achieve success if we get help from others.

 

By Dawn Mentzer
Another Insatiable Solopreneur™ Post

 

Keep Calm…and Make Your Home Office a Productive, Minimal-Stress Zone with Feng Shui

Working from a home office isn’t as free and easy an experience as people often imagine.Feng shui your home office for productivity and stress management

1. Distractions abound.

2. You never completely leave your work behind.

Having felt the stress of some aggressive deadlines and and too much on my plate, I realize it’s not just how I manage my time that makes a difference in my ability to cope. Having a working environment within your home that’s conducive to both productivity and stress management can make the difference between “pumped up” and “burned out”, too.

I’ve been trying to become more in tune with how my surroundings influence my demeanor. For  instance, playing classical music on Pandora while I work tends to soothe my nerves and calm me when I’m feeling frazzled. But I realize there’s much more I could do to make my office a place that enhances my concentration and productivity, while keeping stress at bay. I did a little research on the topic and thought I’d share some of my findings with you.

Ways to Create a More Productive, Less Stressful Home Office

Employ the 5 elements of Feng Shui

With thousands of years behind it, the concept of feng shui fascinates me. The ancient Chinese system, which uses design choices to create and guide our physical and emotional energy, involves five elements we can use to achieve a balanced state in our home offices. It’s actually a lot more complex than that, but here are some elemental basics if you’ve got an open mind and want to try to incorporate some of the principles of feng shui into your home office. The key is to have a healthy balance of the five elements so the energy of your space is working for you rather than against you.

  • Wood
    Wood represents personal growth, intuition, inspiration, and creativity. Consider decorating your space with some wood furniture, small plants, and perhaps some flowers. The color green is traditionally associated with the wood element. And purple, believe it or not, is another wood color. It represents abundance and expression. When looking to accentuate your creative powers through wood, choose energizing, not dull or gray hues.

 

  • Earth
    Earth energy serves to support and ground you. It provides stability and balance. Decor (like baskets or ceramic pots) low to the ground and square, rectangular, and horizontal objects, particularly made of earth materials like straw, stone, and brick will enhance earth’s stabilizing properties in your work space. Earth colors are brown and yellow, but make sure the yellow is muted rather than clear and bright.

 

  • Fire
    Fire promotes transformation, leadership, and enthusiasm. Its energy helps you welcome new ideas and gives you the motivation to share your abilities and skills. In your home office, candles, sunlight through your window, and lamps can all bring more fire energy into your space. Decor items shaped liked triangles, diamonds and pyramids and the colors red, orange, and pink are associated with fire.  Aim for bright colors and semi-gloss paints that make the room more reflective to boost your office’s fire power.

 

  • Metal
    Metal enhances clarity and logic. It actually has two aspects, just like the mind: a dense and focused left-brained aspect and a dynamic, in motion left-brained aspect.  White, gray, and silver are left-brain energy boosting colors, while the rainbow colors stimulate creativity. Decor items that can help pull you into focus include wind chimes and bells. Metallic shelves, desks, and office accessories can boost creative energy.

 

  • Water
    The water element represents release and rejuvenation. It helps you let go of what isn’t beneficial and opens you to renewal of your insight and inspiration. Fountains, aquariums, and objects with reflective surfaces can bring water energy to your office. Colors of the water element include black and deeper, darker hues of blue.

Note that the objects you place in your office can represent multiple elements. For example, a metal desk with its horizontal surface represents both metal and earth. In other words, you can get more bang for your buck if you thoughtfully select objects.

Based on my untrained assessment of my office, I’ve got a lot of earth in my space, a decent amount of metal, but I could stand to some more water, fire, and wood. I’m hoping the candle with the wooden wick in my photo will help with that, but it appears some office accessories shopping is in order.

Have you ever considered the principles of feng shui for your home office? At first glance, is your working space feng shui friendly or a feng shui failure?

By Dawn Mentzer
Another Insatiable Soloprener™ Post

Sources:

McWilliams, Stephanie. “The Elements of Feng Shui”. n.d. http://www.hgtv.com/decorating-basics/the-elements-of-feng-shui/index.html (accessed April 27, 2014).

Stasney, Sharon. Feng Shui Chic: Stylish Designs for Harmonious Living. Edited by Laura Best. New York, NY: Sterling Publishing, Co., Inc./Chapelle, Ltd., 2000.

 

My Solopreneur Sanity Saver: Help At Last!

My last post focused on what solopreneurs should consider when exploring bringing on a freelance assistant to help them keep up – and keep sane! So it seems appropriate to take a moment to introduce my new freelance assistant, Rose Boettinger. Even before we started working together, Rose took the initiative to demonstrate her value by pointing out (tactfully of course!) a sneaky typo that previously eluded detection on my website. As you’ll read later in this post, Rose found me via the Lancaster Chamber website and proactively reached out to me via email. I instantly admired her go-getter attitude. And, as fate would have it, I was in the throes of several “at capacity” weeks where I struggled to find time to catch my breath. Long story short: This was meant to be!

I hope you’ll join me in welcoming Rose! She will be assisting me with some research, proofreading, and administrative responsibilities. Note that Rose is seeking a full-time or part-time position that will put her exceptional writing and proofreading talents to work. If your company or one that you know is seeking someone with her skills, I encourage you to reach out to her on Linkedin, or you can ask me for an introduction.

Anyways, enough from me! Without further ado…

Here’s a note from Rose Boettinger, freelance writer/personal assistant, to tell you a bit more about herself and her aspirations…

I found Dawn on the Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce website while searching for potential job opportunities. Rose Boettinger - freelance writer, proofreaderWhen I came across her information, I took it upon myself to check out her website. As a less experienced freelance writer, I thought it well worth my time to explore the ins and outs of a more established and professional freelancer. While reading her biography, I learned just how involved in and dedicated to her work she is and I felt the need to contact her firsthand. I wanted to see if I could do anything for her to lighten her load, tedious work so that she could spend more time collaborating with clients, giving them even more time and attention they deserve.

I was surprised at just how casual and friendly her response was. It’s often difficult to get a grasp of someone’s personality or how they mean to interact with you, especially over the internet. Not with Dawn. Ever since the first email I received, it has been easy to tell that she puts her heart into every word she writes. She is incredibly down-to-earth and such an easy woman to talk to.

Before I began freelance writing, I attended Millersville University of Pennsylvania where I graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in English and a Concentration in Writing Studies. While attending the university, I worked at the campus writing center, assisting students with the many steps of the writing process—brainstorming, thesis development, proofreading, etc. That was by far my favorite experience while furthering my education. During the last semester of my senior year, I was an intern at an internet marketing company where my eyes were first introduced to the world of SEO. I spent much of my time there filing client information, proofreading, and blogging.

 In the future, I plan to find a company that will allow me to use my experience with writing and proofreading to help expand the business and create more satisfied clients. I will also publish a best seller.

I’m very excited to have the opportunity to assist Dawn, and I can’t wait to see where it takes us. – Rose

______________________

By Dawn Mentzer

Another Insatiable Solopreneur™ Post

Client Relationships: There’s No Room for “Us” vs. “Them” – Only “We” in Small Business

Building strong relationships with clients stands at the center of the the small business universe.

An “us” vs. “them” mentality when working with clients isn’t only unproductive, it can be debilitating. What joy and No us vs. them - just we in small businesssatisfaction is there in working with people you view as your opponents?  Clients aren’t the enemy. Sure, occasionally you’ll meet one who puts your patience to the test, but if you’ve been careful about choosing who you work with, overall you’ll find clients are good people with good intentions. And to state the obvious, your business needs them!

From the very start of my freelance career nearly 5 years ago, I quickly discovered the best way to establish trust and loyalty when working with clients is to interact with them as partners.

When you approach relationships with clients as partnerships, your clients feel comfortable to approach them that way, too. I believe the way to “we” starts with us and how we interact with clients.

Ways to demonstrate a “We” mindset when building and maintaining client relationships:

  • Communicate often.
  • Communicate clearly.
  • Take an interest in them as people, not just income sources.
  • Make an effort to understand their expectations and goals.
  • Go the extra mile to share articles and resources you think might benefit their businesses.
  • Interact with them on social media.
  • Apologize if you make a mistake.
  • When clients make mistakes, gently present the facts rather than point fingers.
  • Address misunderstandings quickly and politely.
  • Be honest.
  • Be attentive.
  • Be responsive.
  • Let them in…Be open to sharing about yourself beyond your business.
  • Acknowledge and celebrate their successes.

The benefits a “We” mindset brings to your small business:

  • Strengthens clients’ loyalty to you.
  • Results in mutual respect/less stress.
  • More relaxed working environment.
  • Leads to repeat business.
  • Creates camaraderie – and often friendships.
  • Can lead to higher quality referrals.
  • Makes work seem less like work.

While a We mindset takes two, you can move your client relationships in that direction by how you choose to interact with and treat your clients. It requires some extra effort to approach business that way, but I can’t imagine doing it any other way. Can you?

 

By Dawn Mentzer
Another Insatiable Solopreneur™ post

Want to Make Clients Thirst for Your Services? Think Beer.

Blue Moon has its orange slice.Bottles of beer

Corona has its lime.

While I’m not a big beer drinker, I think both brands give us small biz peeps something worthwhile to think about.

What can we serve on the side to enhance and augment our core services and give our clients an experience they want to order over and over again?

You might say, “But malt beverages are way different than what I provide to my customers.” While that’s probably true, it doesn’t mean you can’t apply the same logic to differentiating your business.

Bottoms up! Brainstorm about what will make your clients say “Cheers!”…

Think about what complementary topics you’re savvy about that you don’t offer as billable service offerings, but for which you could offer some advice or share relevant resources. For example, I bill clients for my work as a freelance content writer, but I often provide clients, prospects, and even other writers with guidance on social media, networking, and online efficiency tools. Those things are my lime wedges and orange slices, and I’m sure that with a little thought, you’ll discover you’ve got your own to serve up in your business.

It’s all about value! What can you add to your offerings to make your brand more appealing? What garnish will help make your brand the one clients thirst for?

 

Your turn! What ways have you discovered you can provide additional value to your clients?

 

By Dawn Mentzer (a.k.a. The Insatiable Solopreneur™)

 

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Image courtesy of Gualberto107 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Is It Time to Say Bye-Bye to Your Business Facebook Page?

As a solopreneur/small business owner, I’m getting more frustrated with Facebook by the day. I know I’m not alone. JustGood bye note recently the platform admitted to what most of us suspected all along, they really aren’t interested in giving your posts exposure to your audience unless you’re willing to pay to play.  This article by Ad Age explains it.

As I’ve seen my posts’ reach dwindle from a decent yet still annoying 35 – 40% to as low as 6%, I’m asking myself, “Why bother?” Facebook has apparently deemed my posts  unworthy of the attention of my fans (You know, the people who consciously liked my page so they could see my posts?) and has chosen not to display them in their news feeds.  Given that my posting frequency, interaction, and content quality have been consistent all along, there doesn’t seem to be much I can do to change the downward spiral. Except pay for ads or to promote my posts, but I won’t.

Like many other small businesses, my purpose for maintaining a Facebook for my business has been to build and nurture relationships, not blatantly sell my stuff. While they say they’re making these changes to improve users’ overall experience on the site, I’m failing to see how that will succeed. Won’t showing only promoted posts and paid ads to users subject them to more “push” marketing content and less authentic content meant to provide value and engage them in conversation?

Are you considering deleting your business Facebook page?

I am. I believe my time and effort posting and monitoring activity on my business Facebook page will be better spent building my interaction on Google+ and Twitter. Still, I realize it’s not wise to just jump ship and swim away from the fans who have been – when the omnipotent forces at Facebook allow them to see my posts – engaged and supportive.

Jenn Herman recently wrote a post providing some extremely helpful and practical tips on how to communicate with your fans about your plans to leave your Facebook page behind.  If you’re contemplating a transition away from your business page, you’ll want to heed her advice!

On Jenn’s checklist of how to prepare Facebook fans, she includes the tip “Don’t Go Cold Turkey.” I agree. A gradual exit will help ensure the vast majority of your fans are aware of your intent and have time to connect with you on other platforms before you officially cut the cord.

After your business Facebook page is laid to rest, you can still benefit professionally from Facebook!

All or nothing? It doesn’t have to be that way with Facebook. While I intend to put the ax to my business Facebook page, I’ll keep my personal profile alive and kicking. Heck, it’s the only way I’m connected with my fellow Oley Valley High School grads. AND a good many of the professional connections who are fans of my business page have also friended me on Facebook. AND I’m following their business Facebook pages (and will be until they, too, decide to delete them) through my personal profile. So as my personal self , I’ll have ample opportunity to build rapport and show support of their businesses on Facebook if they haven’t yet embraced other online social networks. Also, as appropriate, I’ll share content that’s business-related on my personal timeline. I’ve seen a lot of professionals do that successfully.

What about you? Have you seen your business Facebook page reach and engagement plummet? Are you planning to keep your page or ditch it?

P.S.  Please know I respect Facebook’s right to make a buck, but I think they’re approaching it the wrong way. They set the expectation among small business owners that the platform would serve as a viable, free tool for generating brand awareness and building relationships with customers. It was at one time, until they started tweaking their algorithms to the point where business page owners had to start standing on their heads and doing circus tricks to get their posts seen by their fans. Now not even the “tricks” work. Only cold, hard cash does…and not even for building genuine engagement. What if they’d instead offer biz page owners a subscription-based service (at maybe $9.99/month) to have their posts shown to page fans? I might consider staying if something like that were available. You?

By Dawn Mentzer

 

Image courtesy of gubgib / FreeDigitalPhotos.net