Big Influence Comes in Small Packages

As solopreneurs and small business owners, we all want to raise awareness of our businesses. We want to get noticed by the people who matter. That’s the same whether we’re networking in person or online via social media networks. Across social media, you’ll find no shortage of articles about “engaging with influencers.” We’re urged to seek them out to propel our brands to bigger and better things. Get the heavy hitters to take notice of you, and you’ll be golden, right? Maybe, but attempting to stand out in the crowd can be tough.

Caution: Don’t put all your eggs in the typical “influencer” basket.

It seems many small business owners think of influencers as the people who have tens of thousands of Twitter followers, a multitiude of Facebook fans, and gaggles of Google+ people following them. They hang on their every word, share their posts, and add their comments to the hundred or so that others left on the influencers’ status updates and blog posts. All in an attempt to get recognized by these ultimate authorities.

But how is that going to help your business? Sure, maybe you’ll get lucky and out of all the thousands of other people vying to get their attention, the A-listers will follow you and single out one of your blog posts down the road. But the chances aren’t really in your favor. I’m not being pessimistic. I’m being realistic. It’s not that they don’t care or that you’re not worthy; they’ve got so much interaction coming at them, they can’t possibly keep tabs and give time to everyone who engages with them.

Does that mean you shouldn’t read their blogs and share their content? I’m not implying that at all. Definitely do if you find them helpful and appropriate for your audience, but don’t put all your eggs in their baskets. There are people in your online network who have far fewer followers, but who stand to increase awareness of your brand far more than the heavy hitters.

Influence isn’t exclusively owned by the big guys.

Make it a priority to interact with professionals who have a lesser online following. Note that a lesser following doesn’t mean they aren’t influential, reputable, intelligent people. I follow a slew of less-widely-known people, marketing firms, and small brands who provide excellent content and insight. I believe it’s important – and ultimately more beneficial – for solopreneurs and small biz owners to put effort into cultivating those relationships online. Why? You won’t get lost in the shuffle.

When you interact with these people…

  • Your comments and input won’t get lost in the crowd.
  • You’ll find they’re more willing and able to reciprocate by sharing and commenting on your content.
  • You can become top of mind as an expert in your field to their followers if you’re consistent in providing value through your engagement with them.
  • You’ll have a better chance of gaining referrals because you’ve been able to escape the noise and build relationships.

Find the right mix.

So as you fine-tune your online M.O., aspire to find balance in your efforts. Follow not only the revered and famous, but also lesser know professionals who know their stuff and whom you find common ground with. By showing you’re in tune with what everyone is talking about AND demonstrating you’re capable of finding resources others may have overlooked, you’ll steadily build your own authority online.

 

By Dawn Mentzer

The Plusses for Solopreneurs on Google+

Although Google+ has over 300 million active users, many solopreneurs and small biz owners still seem to view it with Google+ iconskeptism and doubt. Many have the impression it’s a ghost town…that no one they know or want to interact with is using it. Others don’t relish the idea of maintaining a presence on yet another social network.

I understand the arguments (OK, the first one not so much!), but if you haven’t already, I urge you to rethink using Google+ as business development tool. Like any social network, you get out of it what you put into it. I’ve found Google+ gives you a fighting a chance to get more for your efforts.

Here’s the short list of what I’ve found professionally beneficial about Google+:

  • Less labor-intensive to build a following

    I’ve been on G+ since Nov. 2011, and to date, 5001 people have me in their circles. Compare that to my business Facebook page which has been around since June 20, 2011 and has 289 fans and to Twitter where I’ve got 1,770 followers since Feb. 25, 2010. Up until recently, I wasn’t quite as active on G+ as I was on the other networks and still my numbers grew. Sure, social media follower counts aren’t everything, but in my case I’ve found the degree of quality interaction has risen along with my numbers. The key ALWAYS is to post content relevant to your target audience so the right people find and connect with you.

  • Effective at driving discovery of your content

While no one (to my knowledge) has proven that  G+ directly improves search ranking, it without a doubt increases exposure of your content online through shares by others. Just as I’ve found it’s easier to build a following on Google+, I’ve also discovered the people using the network professionally generally seem more inclined than those on other networks to share good content and engage with other users.

  • Doesn’t penalize you for branding yourself

Unlike Facebook, Google+ doesn’t care if your personal profile’s cover photo represents you professionally, and the folks at Google don’t mind if your photo contains more than 20% text content. My cover photo is my logo – which is almost entirely text.  You can post business-related content through your personal profile with abandon. No you can’t post spammy crap without penalty, but that’s the same for any network.

  • Doesn’t select what it thinks you want to see

    Unlike your Facebook fans, G+ users have complete control over how much or how little they want to see from you in their stream.

    Google+ lets YOU decide what you want to see. It doesn’t decide for you.

  • Doesn’t litter your followers’ streams

G+ lets you decide if the people who circle you see everything you +1 so you can actively engage with others without flooding your followers with your activity beyond your own posts and shares.

  • Pro-power of Communities

Google+ Communities are kind of sort of the equivalent of Linkedin Groups. The communities enable professionals with like or complementary interests to share information and engage in conversations that matter to them. Although I haven’t embraced the professional power of Google+ Communities nearly to the degree I should be, I feel impelled to mention them to you. They are the place to be if you want to expand your industry knowledge and build business relationships.

Keep in mind, as with any other social network, you need to commit to Google+ for the long haul to get results. Social media is about building relationships, building authority in your field, and building trust. THAT’s how you effectively covert connections into customers. It takes patience. It also takes using your G+ profile in a way that will build your brand. I use mine mainly for posting about small biz, solopreneurship, marketing, social, media and freelancing…it’s got a “business casual” tone to it, but I also regularly post content that’s non-business focused (and often humorous) so people get to know me better.

Have you been missing out by avoiding Google+? There’s no better time than now to get started using it to build our brand. Just remember…Ultimately, you control how other G+ users will perceive you through the type of content you’re posting. Don’t expect to make strides professionally through G+ if your feed consists of little more than kitty photos and “JackAss” style videos.

Your turn! What successes and challenges have you experienced with using Google+ professionally?

 

By Dawn Mentzer

“Sick” and “Solopreneur” Don’t Mix: Tips for Working Smart During Cold and Flu Season

Despite our best efforts to take care of ourselves and stay healthy, germs sometimes get their way. Tis the season for Woman not feeling wellcolds and the flu, ailments solopreneurs don’t have time for. Getting hit with “a bug” does more than just make you feel lousy, it could also…

  • knock  your productivity down a few notches.
  • keep you from attending meetings and networking events (and if you do attend you won’t be putting your best foot forward).
  • make the quality of your work suffer temporarily.
  • put you behind schedule and hinder you from reaching your short-term revenue goals.

I feel a little ill just thinking about all that!

Nobody likes the thought of getting sick, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t take some proactive measures to prepare for the worst. While most clients will understand and be sensitive to your predicament, you’ll need to find a way to fulfill your commitments to them in a timely way.

Tips for Staying on Track when You’re Sick:

  • Don’t overload your project schedule.
    Especially during cold and flu season, give yourself some wiggle room. Purposefully schedule windows of open time so if you get behind, you’ll have time slots available to do catch up work. Even one or two half-hour windows each day can help save you from a major backlog.
  • Do your “no brainer” tasks when you’re down for the count.
    Although you might not feel up to creative work or heavy-duty number crunching, try to accomplish some essential, but rather mindless must dos while you’re waiting for your mojo to return. Log your business mileage, organize receipts, update your website portfolio…whatever you can do effectively in your under-the-weather condition.

Of course, the very best way to keep up with your business responsibilities is to take care of yourself so you’re better able to fight off whatever viruses make the rounds this season. You know how it’s done! Get enough sleep each night, eat the right stuff, take your vitamins, drink a lot of water, exercise, wash your hands often…I know, “blah, blah, blah.” But it’s important. As a solopreneur, your business depends on you. So, put some thought into how you’ll manage your work if you get hit by the cold and flu bus, but better still, do what you can to not get run over in the first place!

How do you keep from falling behind on your work when you’re feeling under the weather? 

By Dawn Mentzer

Image courtesy of marin / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

5 Things Freelance Professionals Need to Get Over

To run your own freelance business, you can’t afford to be your own worst enemy. There are times when it gets toughMan jumping over obstacle having your work scrutinized, waiting for  responses from clients, prospecting for new business, and putting your foot down. But these things come with the territory when you freelance, so to get on with business, you need to get over a few things first.

Don’t let these things hold you back in your freelancing business:

Sensitivity to criticism

The beauty of what freelancers do is generally in the eye of the beholder. Clients are subjective…their unique styles, likes, and dislikes will play a role in determining whether or not they like your work. There’s no room for Prima Donnas in freelancing. Accept that not everyone will love all of your work all of the time.

Perfectionism

You’re not perfect. I’m not perfect. No freelancer is. Don’t beat yourself up over mistakes – but own them and do what it takes to make them right. Most important, recognize if there are areas of business where you make mistakes repeatedly. You might need to take more time when tackling them or outsource tasks when possible.

Dislike of networking

Want to get quality clients? Network, network, network – online and in person! I know a fair share of freelancers who very much dislike mixing and mingling in social settings. Avoiding networking activities puts you at a disadvantage. Face-to-face networking can give you a major edge as prospects hear your voice, see your smile, feel your personality up close and personal. You’ll need to embrace social media, too. Used consistently, it builds professional relationships and goodwill because it makes it easy to show support of and interest in prospects and clients.

Impatience

Freelancing requires a willingness  to wait. It takes time to build a portfolio of work, a solid base of clients, and a reputation as the “go to” pro in your field. Sometimes it can take years before a contact turns into a client. Beyond that, the day-to-day stuff requires patience, too. You’ll encounter prospects who don’t respond to your proposals, clients who don’t get back to you with feedback on your work, and occasional payments that won’t arrive by the due date you posted on your invoices. Instant gratification is rare in freelancing – you need to develop a tolerance for waiting.

Discomfort at following up about client payments

That said…while practicing patience in most things, stay politely vigilant about following up on client payments that are overdue. Freelancers aren’t high-volume service providers who can afford to let payments go 30 days…60 days…90 days past due. I’ve found missed payments are not intentional and almost always an oversight. Generally, I wait 7 days past the due date and then send an email to inquire (always in a non-accusatory tone).

Traveling the freelancing career path requires the guts and gumption to put preconceived habits and inclinations aside. You won’t always find it comfortable to change your thoughts and practices. But after you start reaping the rewards from altering elements of your M.O., you’ll find it easier to get past the other things that might be holding your freelance business down.

What have you needed to get over to go forward in your freelance biz? What methods and ways of thinking have you found most difficult to set aside?

By Dawn Mentzer

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

3 Ways to Nip Nagging Tasks in the Bud

When you’re a solopreneur, you’ve pretty much got to do it all – or at least see that everything gets done one way or another. That means prioritizing projects and tasks. Most of us make sure the revenue-generating activities come first followed by “lesser” responsibilities. But sometimes left undone,  the non-revenue producing, tedious but essential tasks can nag at you – making you less productive on the assignments that are bringing home the bacon. That’s when they deserve more attention than you’ve been giving them. While they might not be as mission critical at face value, they become ever so significant when they become a distraction. If you find they’re minimizing your productivity or detract from your creativity, it’s time to approach them differently than you are now.

Nip nagging business tasks in the bud!

There are a couple of ways to do that…

Put them on a “to do” list
It works for some people. Simply get them off  your mind by putting them on paper, into a spreadsheet, or into a tool like Evernote until you can get to them.

Schedule them on your calendar
Reserve time for each tedious task (no matter how small it might be) on your calendar where you have open slots between your “meat and potatoes” projects. By putting them into your master plan, they won’t hang over your head.

Take weekend morning, afternoon, or evening to get ’em done
Bam! Take the time you need in one fell swoop to swipe them off your slate. If the tasks are relatively mindless, you might even half-watch a movie or a few TV sitcoms while you’re taking care of business. That way it won’t seem quite so much like work.

So what are some of those no fun, but need to be done tasks that might need inclusion in one of those approaches?

  • Logging vehicle mileage
  • Entering receipts into QuickBooks (or whatever you use for keeping accounting records)
  • Generating invoices or logging payments from clients
  • Cleaning up/organizing your social media contacts (ie. putting Twitter followers into lists, putting Google+ contacts into appropriate circles, unfollowing contacts who don’t provide valuable content and who otherwise it makes no sense for you to keep on the radar, etc.)
  • Accepting Linkedin invitations
  • Deleting Spam from your Twitter Direct Messages
  • Deleting unneeded files from your computer
  • Deleting email messages that you’ll no longer need
  • Deduping contacts in your Smartphone

All of them and more can interfere with your powers of concentration and taunt you if left incomplete. So, take action and put them in their place so you can give the important stuff your full attention.

How do you keep nagging tasks from sabotaging your productivity?

By Dawn Mentzer

 

6 Types of Profile Pics that are Worse than an Egg

First impressions matter – especially when you’re looking to build your brand and be recognized as a professional whoTwitter egg is worth the while to connect with. As good as your credentials may be, the very first thing people notice on your online profiles is your profile photo. If it’s an egg or a shadowy silhouette, I’ll bet you’re not making as many as connections as you could be. I’m sometimes near merciless when teasing my small biz friends and colleagues who have yet to upload their photos – particularly on Linkedin. Again, first impressions matter – especially online where you often don’t have a face-to-face opportunity to project the real you.  But as bad as eggs and shadows are as profile pics, there are (believe it or not!) worse choices!

Want to be taken seriously as a professional? Think twice before using any of the below as your profile photo…

Fido or Tiger
Lots of people ooh and ahh over dogs and cats, but using yours as your profile photo on a network you intend to use primarily to build your brand will make you look less  professional. Well, maybe not if you’re a dog groomer or pet sitter…actually, even then it’s not a good idea.

It Takes Two
Posting a couples shot as your profile pic is…well…odd. MAYBE, if the face of your business is you and your spouse, it might be appropriate on your Facebook Page or G+ page. But not on your individual Linkedin profile. That photo should be all you.

Leaving too much to the imagination
Beware of bared shoulders and low necklines on photos that when cropped give the illusion that you’re in the buff. Awkward!

Sexy and you know it
While there might be a few professions (ahem) that justify putting on pouty lips and a seductive stare when saying “cheese” for a profile pic, it’s generally not the way to go.

Don’t mess with me
Making connections online is about being approachable. Your facial expression on your profile pic can either draw people to you or push them away. Don’t post a pic that makes you look menacing, mean, angry, or otherwise stand-offish.

Comic relief
You might argue that using a cartoon or caricature as a profile photo shows creativity. But if you’re trying to build your professional network do you really want to be known as the guy or gal who used a silly drawing for your profile pic? Even if it’s in the likeness of you. It’s not you.

Remember, your profile pic makes a strong first impression, so make sure yours is projecting the image you want prospects and customers to have of you. Realize, too, that even the profile pics you use on your personal online social networks can impact how others perceive you professionally. You have more flexibility on them, but be cognizant of the appropriateness of what you post when you’ve got business colleagues and clients within your personal networks.

What professional profile pic faux pas have you seen online? 

By Dawn Mentzer

Nixing Negativity for the Good of Your Business

Negativity is a downer and productivity drainer – just like Dan Waldshmidt points out in the article I shared inThumbs up, Thumbs down my G+ post below.

At least it works that way for me, but in that G+ comment stream, one of my connections pointed to an article on Lifehacker (originally posted on Linkedin) which indicates that isn’t the case for everyone.  While “strategic optimists” look ahead to the best outcomes when planning to meet their goals, “defensive pessimists” envision what could go wrong and plan how to avoid those things.  How are you wired? Good news: studies showed that both types of people are equally capable of achieving. They just find their motivation to act in different ways.

Personally and professionally as a solopreneur, negativity makes me less motivated and less productive. I stay conscious of hurdles and risks, but envision a positive outcome.  And while it’s not always easy or possible, I do my best to minimize exposure to chronically negative people.  You know the type, the chronic complainers who can’t seem to find anything good about anything or anyone.  Thankfully, they’re fewer and farther between than they are plentiful!

https://plus.google.com/109275472958903148502/posts/UYnC6XeF6rA

I agree with Waldschmidt that avoiding negativity is a must – but we should never lose sight of reality in the process.  Those “Pollyannas” who are sunshine and rainbows forever…well, that’s just not natural! It’s not a weakness to feel down at times, get frustrated, or feel scared. It’s human nature. But dwelling on the downsides can be a major anchor to your small business if you consistently focus on what’s wrong rather than doing what’s in your power to put things on the right path or move in a new direction. 

Are you a strategic optimist, defensive pessimist, or somewhat of a hybrid? What impact does negativity have on your motivation and productivity in your business?

Image courtesy of anankkml / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

By Dawn Mentzer

Did I Just Say That?? 4 Words that Could Destroy Your Professional Credibility

Your professionalism can make or break the deal as you communicate and collaborate as a solopreneur.  When talking – Oops gestureeither when meeting one on one or when presenting to a group – you can instantly downgrade your authority and credibility a notch or two by repeatedly making annoying speaking faux pas. Whether you use any of the below because of nervousness, uncertainty of what you want to say, or bad habit, consider making a conscious effort to limit them in your conversations.

Spoken Words that Could Make You Sound Less Professional

LikeI’m like, “Why do so many people say like?” I’m calling myself out on this one! I know many other people who use it conversationally, too. For me, it’s a bad habit I’m working to break. Occasionally using it won’t do much damage, but frequent use will make you sound like a preteen star on a Nickelodeon sitcom.

Um – We tend to use this meaningless filler when we’re gathering our thoughts and searching for what we want to say next. Used sparingly, it won’t be too distracting. But when inserted before or after every sentence it detracts from your message. You’ll sound more together by inserting a silent pause instead of an “um” as you find the right words to use next.

You knowThis is another overused phrase, you know?  If the people you’re talking with already know, why are you telling them? This, too, is usually used out of habit. Again, used minimally it won’t hurt, but overused it will make you sound less professional than you are.

Cuss words – While they sometimes have a place and purpose, often they don’t. Know your audience before you use expletives. Some people are tolerant of them, but others aren’t. Not only will you risk sounding unprofessional by using unnecessary cuss words, but you’ll also risk offending people. Before you curse, ask yourself if it really is the best way to drive home your point. Beware of using swear words gratuitously and freely to the point where they become a hard-to-break habit.

What other words or speaking habits do you think make professionals look/sound less authoritative and respect-worthy?

Image courtesy of Michal Marcol / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

By Dawn Mentzer

Solopreneur Startup Smarts: East Coast and West Coast Solos Share What Works

No matter where you live and work, you’re going to make some really smart – and some not so smart – choices as you start out as a solopreneur. My friend, Carrie Chwierut of Carrie’s Social, and I launched our businesses at nearly the same time back in 2010. Carrie’s a west coast (California) gal and I’m near the east coast (eastern Pennsylvania), but despite our geographical differences, we have a lot in common. Both of us have learned some valuable lessons as our solo-businesses have grown and evolved over the past 4 years.

We’ve compared notes and are sharing the good, the bad and the ugly with you via a synchronized blogging exercise. Here on the Insatiable Solopreneur, I’m reflecting on what we’ve found to be among our smartest moves as new solopreneurs. On her blog, Carrie is sharing what we might have done differently had we known what we know today. So, after you read my post, please do pay a visit to Carrie’s blog to read her post!

Solopreneurial Smarts

What this East Coast Solo would do over again…Dawn Mentzer, East Coast Solopreneur, in Lancaster County Pennsylvania

• Joining the local regional chamber of commerce on Day 1 – and sticking with it!

While it didn’t pay off immediately, over time it has paid for itself many times over. Not only have I gained new clients, but I’ve been able to strengthen relationships with existing clients through my membership.

• Launching a website

Even if you don’t focus on generating leads from it, you need a place for people to go to learn more about you. Websites – particular those that are professionally-designed – give you credibility. I’m amazed at how many freelance writers don’t have websites. Depending on what type of business you have, it’s possible your competitors don’t either. Get there first. It will set you apart.

• Using Hootsuite and Buffer for posting to Twitter

Twitter is a different animal from other social channels. You can’t tweet once or twice a day to gain traction – you need to be prolific! Using Hootsuite and Buffer to schedule tweets and keep tabs on my social media activity has helped me build my online presence. That in turn has helped me build awareness of my brand and connect with some key folks who have brought some great projects my way.

• Getting personal on Linkedin

Sending personalized invitations (rather than the generic option) and responding with a personalized thank you to people who invite me to join their networks has opened to door to opportunities. By making that little bit of extra effort to connect with people, I’ve gotten face-to-face meetings and landed new projects.

• Volunteering strategically

When I transitioned from my corporate career to freelancing, I knew I needed to make more connections within the business community, learn more about being a biz owner, and build my portfolio of writing samples. I became a volunteer with SCORE and a board member of my local Main St. organization. Both experiences helped me build my network, skills and experience. Although my workload from clients is a lot more intense than it was when I first started my business, I still volunteer – only not quite so much.

Carrie Chwierut-West Coast Solopreneur-in CaliforniaThe West Coast Solo weighs in on what has worked for her…

• Launching a website

I completely agree with Dawn on this one! Creating a website was one of the first things I did. It makes you appear more professional and provides potential customers with a broader look at who you are and what your business is all about.

• Announcing it to family and friends

You have to be a little careful here. While you don’t want to bombard your family and friends with countless emails asking them to mention you to their friends, it doesn’t hurt to do a mass announcements to family, friends, past business contacts, etc. telling them that you’ve started a new business and what the services are.

• Joining a Social Media peer group

Finding the right peer group is so important when starting your business. I was lucky enough to have a group approach me about joining, and I gladly accepted. These groups give you a platform in which to vent, ask questions, and learn from the experiences of others in your field of work. The group I joined had a requirement that members share each other’s blog posts on their platforms, too, so it was a great way to support each other.

• “Honesty with clients…always” became my motto

From the start, I felt it important to be totally honest with clients. Whether it was telling them that I didn’t feel I was the best person for the job, or a constructive criticism of their current platforms (if they asked, of course!). If you’re honest with people from the start, you build trust and save yourself some potentially embarrassing and damaging situations down the road.

East, West, North, South…No matter where you’re located, you’ll discover that some of your choices will help put you on the map, while others will get you lost for a little while.

Now, check out Carrie’s post with our self-admitted solopreneurial blunders!
What decisions and actions served you well as you started your business?
Carrie’s California Image (background) courtesy of digitalart at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Boo! What’s Most Terrifying About Being a Solopreneur

Fear. I think every solopreneur feels it to varying degrees throughout the stages of their careers. And with good reason; Fiery skeletons imagestarting and running a business can be scary stuff.  You have elements of uncertainty. You have to work hard – really hard.  You have to deal with things that are sometimes out of your control (personally, that’s the one that frightens me the most!).

As Halloween creeps up on us, I thought I’d share a few of the ghoulish and gruesome challenges solopreneurs face as we establish and build our businesses.

Face Your Fears: The Most Terrifying Things about Being a Solopreneur

Putting Yourself Out There – Networking

This is paralyzing for some solopreneurs. They hesitate to put their best foot forward for fear of sounding conceited, and they dislike networking.  No, not everyone is a “salesperson,” but you have to get out there (face to face and via social media) to build connections and let people know about the value you offer.

Dealing with Numbers – Business Financials

Business financials are spooky to many of us.  Heck, my hands got all cold and clammy just writing this.  When you run a business, you have to learn some of the basics though. You might also want to get the help of a book-keeping professional – even if only to periodically check your Quickbooks or other platform to make sure  you haven’t made any errors.

Wondering, “Am I good enough?”

Especially when starting a business, you might feel trepidation at competing with other solopreneurs and businesses who have been around longer than you. How do you get over that? Confidence and competitive research. Take stock of your strengths and capabilities and learn whatever you can about your competitors to discover what makes you unique and gives you an edge.

Too Little Work. Too Much Work.

If you do a lot of project work as a solopreneur, you might experience cycles of feast and famine. Not having as much work as you want or need can lead to some nervous nail-biting. But having too many projects at one time can also be hair-raising. How do you find the right balance? While not all of it is within your realm of control, you can level things out a bit with careful planning, choosing clients and projects wisely, and knowing your capacity limitations.

Experiencing Failure

Sheer terror! None of us go into business expecting to fail, yet failure comes in all shapes and sizes. Even solopreneurs who have run successful businesses for years deal with failures along the way. Who hasn’t lost a bid on a project or lost a client for some reason or another? Not everything will go the way you want it to all the time. You’ll slip up. Unforeseen circumstances will throw a wrench into your plans. Become mentally agile so you can roll with the punches, learn from your mistakes and misfortunes, and keep your eyes on the big picture.

Life as a solopreneur certainly does put forth some things that go bump in the night, but none should stop you in your tracks and turn you into a business zombie. Stand courageous and show those ghastly entrepreneurial fears who’s boss.

What things have scared you most during your career as a solopreneur?

By Dawn Mentzer

Image courtesy of Victor Habbick / FreeDigitalPhotos.net