The Bare Minimum for Maximal Impact

gray background with plant in minimalist pot accents the "less is more" text

While visiting my friend Tammy in Phoenix for a few days, I was fortunate to also connect in-person with radio personality and master podcast instructor and creator Shannon Hernandez. I met Shannon online (Google+) about eight years ago. It was wonderful to finally have an opportunity to hang out face-to-face for a brief while. As we caught up on what’s happening in our lives and professional ventures, I found myself using the phrase “bare minimum” when referring to my work M.O.

I know “bare minimum” has negative connotations:

  • Just O.K.
  • The lazy way out
  • Born from a lack of motivation
  • Nothing special

But it doesn’t have to—and shouldn’t—mean any of those things.

Adopting a bare minimum mindset involves getting maximal impact without becoming overstressed and overwhelmed. It’s about finding the right combination of clients, types of assignments, and volume of work so that you do your very best without sacrificing your well-being.

Considerations for Achieving a Lucrative Bare Minimum Work Approach

Striving for the bare minimum is a win-win for all when driven by the right intentions.

Consider these things:

  • Do you see a pattern in the types of clients (size, industry, etc.) you like to work with the most or least?
  • What tasks are you doing for clients that could be done better or more efficiently by another resource?
  • Which types of assignments energize you? Which types leave you feeling drained or distracted?
  • What do you do exceptionally well that offers the most value to your clients?
  • Have you priced your services too low? That can cause prospects to underestimate your skills and knowledge. It can also push you into a “make it up in volume” situation, where you’re forced to overload your schedule.
  • Are there viable and relevant passive income opportunities you’ve overlooked? (This one continues to elude me!)
  • What could you change now that would allow you to do more of the types of assignments you love for the types of clients you enjoy working with most?

In Other Words

Another way to convey “bare minimum” is “path of least resistance.” Why work harder not smarter (cliché alert) by doing what you dislike or aren’t particularly good at doing? Especially when that effort will detract from (rather than enhance) your quality of life and the caliber of service you deliver to your clients?

Your turn! What would you add to the list of considerations for creating a professional scenario that provides more satisfaction and less stress?

To Emoji or Not Emoji: Using Emojis in Business Communications

thinking-emoji

“Smiley face,” “heart,” “kissy face,” “wink, wink,” “okay gesture,” “sad face,” “look of surprise”…emojis are everywhere. We find these visual representations of emotions and thought processes on social media, in text messages, and even in email–in both personal and business communications. Perhaps our increasing usage of emojis demonstrates that we are becoming more open and transparent, but is it appropriate professionally?

Marketing consultant Dennis Shiao has written about emoji use–once in 2017 and again in 2018. His most recent article explores how some of his Twitter followers feel about seeing emojis in blog titles. In that article, I weighed in with my response.

Screenshot-tweet-elf-noooo

Although I’m obviously not in favor of emojis in article titles, I do think they have value in business communications. Of course, there are downsides, too. Let’s take a look…

Pros of Using Emojis in Business Communications

Overall, I’m an emoji advocate. I find they often help to clarify my tone and add a layer of emotion that can sometimes get lost when communicating via words alone.

  • Emojis emphasize how much we care about an idea or people.
  • Emojis help us applaud others’ achievements.
  • Emojis soften the blow when we need to decline an invitation to an event or otherwise deliver less-than-ideal news.
  • Emojis lighten the mood and demonstrate our quick wit by giving us a visual way to provide humorous commentary.
  • Emojis show appreciation of others’ sense of humor when people aren’t in earshot of our laughter.

With over 3,000 emojis available in 2019, there’s one for virtually every situation imaginable.

Cons of Using Emojis in Business Communications

But using emojis in business communications isn’t all thumbs up. There are some potential drawbacks, too.

  • Some clients or business partners may consider them unprofessional.
  • If overused, emojis can lose their impact.
  • An emoji that’s funny to one person might be offensive to another.
  • Relying on emojis to communicate our thoughts means less practice expressing ourselves with words. Without flexing our wordsmithing muscles, we risk that they’ll atrophy.
  • Some people may view emojis as insincere, especially if they’re used to convey empathy in unfortunate circumstances.

“The better part of valour is discretion…” ~ William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part One

Emojis can add emphasis and provide visual variety in professional conversations. However, know your audience before using them. Consider the preferences and sensitivities of the person on the receiving end. If you’re unsure of how warmly a prospect or new client will receive emojis, you may want to withhold them until you’ve had more time to assess the person’s communication style and formality expectations.

Your turn! Do you think emojis have a place in business communications? Why or why not?

54 Successes, Failures, and Random Recollections From 54 Years

54 years ago on January 26, my 5-pound 12-ounce self entered this world. My life hasn’t been one of those remarkable ones that you read about in magazines or that warrants an interview with Oprah. I’ve not achieved celebrity status or invented something innovative or embarked on any grand mission to change the world. But during my years here, while I haven’t done any one thing that’s extraordinary, I have done a lot of things (after all, 54 years is quite a long time).

I thought it would be fun to take a look back. So, I decided to put some concentrated brain power toward remembering some of the successes, failures, and random memories of my experience on this earth thus far. Working through this exercise, I found the flood of recollections therapeutic. My life has been a pretty damn good one. Maybe not the stuff of a compelling biography, but it’s mine and it’s special to me. I expect that anyone else who has also led an “ordinary” life and takes time to reflect on their journey will discover their experiences collectively paint a colorful and unique painting.  

54 Random Reflections From My 54 Years (in no particular order)

  1. At around age 5, I took ballet, tap, and gymnastics lessons at a local dance studio. The day of the recital, I was so nervous I pretended to be sick so that I didn’t have to perform.
  2. In 4th grade, I was the fastest kid in our class (girls and boys, included).
  3. When I was about 12, I visited a farm and the owner gave me a fresh egg from the chicken coop. I set up a box with a night light over it in my bedroom and rotated the egg under the light several times a day for 20 or so days in hopes that it would hatch. It did and my pet “Ricky Chick” was born.
  4. My family took a two-week vacation cross country to Wyoming when I was in middle school. We borrowed my aunt and uncle’s custom van. The places we visited during the road trip included the Badlands, Mt. Rushmore, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park, Jackson Hole, and a former neighbor’s ranch in Lander, Wyoming.
  5. I took baton twirling lessons for approximately 7 years and was a feature twirler in the Oley Valley High School Marching Band in my junior and senior years.
  6. I auditioned for the Millersville University Marching Band my sophomore year and didn’t make the cut.
  7. I performed in plays and musicals throughout high school, college, and in community theater. Shows and roles include: No, No Nanette (dancer); South Pacific (nurse); Oliver (Widow Corney); Night of January 16th (Nancy Lee Faulkner); Chamber Music (Amelia Earhart); TV (various roles); Spoon River Anthology (various roles); Angel Street (Bella); How the Other Half Loves (Fiona); The Insect Comedy (Chrysalis, and I directed one of the acts); Lil Abner (Dogpatch wife); Busybody (Marian); A Murder is Announced (Phillipa); Nuts (Attorney MacMillan); Steel Magnolias (M’Lynn)
  8. I studied Kung Fu for 4 years.
  9. In college, I was anorexic. What unexpectedly helped me overcome it was joining a weight training class during my senior year in which the coach encouraged me to consider bodybuilding. Thanks to him, my struggle for control shifted from starving myself to becoming more powerful. I regret never reaching out to him years later to tell him that he saved my life. About 10 years ago, I learned that he had passed away.
  10. From 1993 to 1997, I competed in a total of seven amateur bodybuilding competitions. In 2001 and 2002, I coached a team of first-time bodybuilders. Several continued to compete up until just a few years ago.
  11. I married one of the funniest people I have ever met.
  12. I gave birth to my daughter on September 11, 2001. While in labor, I was watching the Today Show and saw the plane hit the second tower, live.
  13. I graduated cum laude from Millersville University with a B.S. degree in Communications and a concentration in Journalism.
  14. I worked for a non-profit regional theatre as a marketing and public relations assistant for two years. One of my biggest regrets was quitting that job. It didn’t pay squat, but I believe many possible paths would have opened to me had I stuck it out.
  15. I bartended for four years.
  16. I worked for a regional, family-owned telecommunications company for 17 years. I thought I would retire there. When a national company bought that company, my entire department was eliminated.  
  17. I started a freelance writing business in 2010 with virtually no current portfolio or business startup knowledge.
  18. My first freelance customer stiffed me. He owed me a whopping $60.
  19. Only one other customer stiffed me in the past 9 years.
  20. I landed a paid (barely) acting gig portraying a gypsy/ fire eater’s sidekick at the Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire during the summer of ‘85.
  21. I was diagnosed with scoliosis when I was 21. It has progressed since. About 20 years ago, a surgeon told me I will likely need spinal fusion surgery at about age 55 to prevent the condition from compromising my heart and lungs. I think I can tough it out longer.
  22. I don’t do competitive bodybuilding anymore (my scoliosis has ruined all chances for that), but I still lift religiously.
  23. I can comfortably push 370 pounds (weight of the plates) for 5 reps on the leg press machine. Almost where I was at over 20 years ago. My bench press sucks, though.
  24. I ran the Merrill Down ‘N Dirty Mud Run in 2011 and placed 9th out of the 104 participants in my age group.
  25. I was inducted into the National Honor Society in high school.
  26. I failed my DMV road test. Twice.
  27. I was a Camp Fire Girl. Our troop met weekly at the Oley Valley Youth Building.
  28. I was a Brownie Girl Scout leader for 3 years.
  29. I was runner up to homecoming queen at the first homecoming our high school ever had.
  30. I was one of the candidates in the running to represent our school at the county Junior Miss pageant, but I wasn’t selected.
  31. I led an eating disorders support group for a year.
  32. In 2016, I wanted to add a second dog to our pack. We took in a sweet rescue pit bull (Sydney, who we renamed “Loki). Unfortunately, we soon realized we had a lot more work to do with our incumbent pitty mix, Lulu. I was heartbroken. Rather than send him back to rescue, we kept him as a foster dog and assisted in finding him a new home. Fortunately, some family friends met him, fell in love with him, and made him a part of their family. I visit him from time to time.
  33. One year, when chaperoning a church youth beach trip, I temporarily lost my wedding ring in the sand. A nice lady with a metal detector found it for me.
  34. I played fast-pitch softball (third base and pitcher) in a summer youth league back in the day.
  35. I volunteered as a SCORE mentor with the Lancaster-Lebanon chapter for three years. I served on their Executive Board as their V.P. of Marketing for one of those years.
  36. I was the jello wrestling champion at an “Almost Anything Goes” competition during high school. I represented the National Honor Society team. In the final match, I faced off with a very statuesque, muscular woman from Kutztown University. I pinned her in 3 seconds flat.
  37. I had a pet snake (a rainbow boa constrictor) named Flakey from when I was in third grade until two years out of college.
  38. I’ve kept a potentially life-ruining secret for a friend for over 25 years.
  39. I’ve visited and partially hiked the Grand Canyon.
  40. I traveled to Hawaii (Oahu and the Big Island) in 2017.
  41. I got dumped by my date at prom my junior year of high school.
  42. I was asked to write the foreword to my friend’s book about her brother, “I Am Not My Body. A Tribute to Jim MacLaren.”
  43. I was diagnosed with asthma when I was 30 years old—but after about 10 years, it disappeared.
  44. I had a leopard gecko named Lilo. At the age of 7, she died. On my birthday. 🙁
  45. Upon graduating from Millersville University, I was presented the Edward J. Laucks Memorial Sertoma Award for Excellence in Communications.
  46. I scored miserably on my SATs.
  47. I wrote a health and fitness column called “Body Business” in the Millersville University student newspaper.
  48. I was voted “Best Legs” and “Best Personality” in my class in high school.
  49. I once tried out for the high school basketball team but quit before cuts were made. I have no doubt that I would have been among them.
  50. During the summer after I graduated from college in 1987, I held three jobs at once.
  51. One year, when attending the Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire with my family, I was randomly chosen to be an audience participant in a knife juggling/throwing act.  Another year, I was pulled on stage to be a part of a wench auction.
  52. I grew up with a regulation-size pool table in our family basement. I’m out of practice, but I’m a decent shot.
  53. I originally planned to major in social work.
  54. Twice, I tried to get through Ayn Rand’s “Atlas Shrugged.” I failed both times.

And there you have it—some highs, lows, and in-betweens of my life experience. Perhaps some of it explains a lot. And some of it surely explains nothing.

Your turn! I challenge you to think back on your achievements and let-downs throughout your life journey. What 54 (or 32 or 75 or 43 or 21) memories made your list? I’m looking forward to reading about them.

Social Media: It Is What We Make It

framed box with black and white blocks within

As a new presidential election nears, the environment on social media is already becoming extraordinarily contentious.

Here we go again. Over the next two years, things will get ugly.

People will rant. People will rave. People will engage in digital slugfests.

People will “unfriend” and “unfollow” relatives, coworkers, neighbors, and long-time friends…all because they turn differences in philosophies and priorities into personal insults.

Sigh.

But amid the chaos and combativeness, social media’s dark side has an alter ego—a platform for unification and support.

I’ve personally witnessed the power of people in our community pulling together through efforts to find a scared, runaway dog several weeks ago. And, early last week, after 14 people lost their homes in a disastrous apartment fire a few miles from my house, our police department’s Facebook page became a hub for community members to discuss how to help those displaced. Also, just last Friday, when an erratic driver crashed into a car with several Warwick High School students (two of whom have died since the accident), the outpouring of support for the families, school staff, and grieving community has been extraordinary.

Later this week, I’ll be expanding on my own first-hand experience with social media’s bright side in a blog post for #Strella Social Media. But I felt compelled to touch on it now, as well.

Social media—particularly, its tone and its temperament—is what we make it. It’s up to us whether we use it as a tool for fueling hostility or facilitating goodwill.

 

In what ways have you seen social media used to unify rather than divide? I’d love to read about your experiences!

 





Tips for Making Sure a Content Slip-up Won’t Destroy Your Brand Image

It only takes a few wrong words in a few split seconds to turn a well-respected brand into one abhorred by the masses.Tan sneaker ready to step on slippery banana peel

That’s the power—and the pitfall—of social media. One gaffe in a moment of misjudgment can lead to a potential firestorm of fury that inflicts permanent public relations damage.

 

How to Manage Your Brand’s Content and Maintain Your Good PR Standing

Whether you’re a solopreneur responsible for posting your own content or a marketing manager or business owners with multiple team members at the helm of your social media accounts, it’s critical to manage your content wisely so it doesn’t go rogue on you.

 

If you’re like me, the sole person handling your posts, it’s important to set rules and reminders for yourself so that you don’t accidentally cross any lines.

 

If you rely on others to create and post content, you face a more daunting challenge. As a contributing writer for Straight North, I wrote an article that’s focused on addressing that. It’s about how to avoid content crises that can ruin a company’s reputation.

 

Tips that I expand on in the post include:

  • Develop a style guide for your content.
  • Establish a social media policy.
  • Coach your team.

 

Check it out on the Alison May Public Relations blog!

 





4 Reasons to Have Multiple Freelance Content Writers

Outsourcing your blog writing and copywriting to a freelance content writer can save you a lot of time, energy, laptop and notepadfrustration. Also, it can prevent you from sounding unprofessional if you or no one on your staff has writing skills.

 

A marketing writer who understands your brand can ensure your communications have consistency and continuity.

 

When you find one that fits perfectly with your company’s culture and “gets it,” hold onto that resource.

 

But regardless of how happy you are with that person, don’t make the mistake of using the services of only that one freelance writer.

 

Why It’s Critical to Have Multiple Freelance Content Writers for Your Business

Every writer has strengths and weaknesses.

Not every writer will be right for every assignment. Some are better at short-form content (such 600- to 800-word blog posts) while others shine at longer-form content (like white papers and ebooks). Some are adept at crafting brand slogans and print ad copy, while others are skilled at writing website copy that appeals to readers and search engines.

 

Takeaway: If you can find a writer who is the complete package, fantastic! But you may discover you need more than one writer to ensure all of your marketing content is top-notch.

 

Capable writers have busy schedules.

“Freelance” doesn’t mean “lounging around with nothing to do.” Established writers often have maxed out project schedules. If you have an “emergency” assignment that needs a quick turn-around, you might be out of luck. Most freelance content writers that I know (myself included) will do their best to accommodate rush requests, but that’s not always possible.

 

Takeaway: If you have relationships with several freelancers, you increase your odds of having a writing resource to help when you’re in a pinch.

 

Writers get sick, go on vacation, and have family emergencies.

Yes, we do. Fortunately, these situations are the exception rather than the rule. However, they can affect the volume of work we’re able to take on and create the need for extended deadlines now and then.

 

Takeaway: Having several writers to turn to will help you navigate times when your go-to writer will be out of town or is dealing with unforeseen circumstances.

 

It may be time for a change.

At some point in time, either you or your writer may decide it’s time to part ways. You may decide you want a fresh approach and feel a new writer is your best way to accomplish it. Or, your writer may choose to discontinue doing certain types of assignments or cease doing work for your industry.

 

Takeaway: Business relationships evolve. By having more than one writer to help you with your content, you will not feel stuck without options or be left high and dry when a writer opts to make a change.

 

Where to a Find Competent Freelance Content Writer

Doing searches on LinkedIn and Google will help you find potential candidates to help you with your content needs. Also, ask fellow business owners and marketing managers for recommendations. And, believe it or not, the freelancer you’re currently working with might be happy to connect you with other writers. I have introduced several of my clients to writers that I respect and trust to do good work.

 

Relying on one writer for everything can put your content at risk of falling behind deadlines or not being done as well as it could be. I believe you’ll find it’s well worth the time and effort to build relationships with multiple writers. Not only will it help ensure you have quality content for any assignment, but it will also provide peace of mind that all your eggs are not in one basket.





The First Step To Emotional Intelligence

I’ve been mulling over two blog posts I had read last week.silhouette of head with brain diagram within it

 

It’s OK to Be on Your Way by Rachel Strella

 

13 Signs of High Emotional Intelligence by author Justin Bariso

 

Both articles crossed my radar thanks to tweets by two of my favorite Twitter friends, Rachel Strella and Dennis Shiao. Although the posts’ topics are different at face value, they possess a strong synergy.

 

Rachel’s post, It’s OK to Be on Your Way, touches on how many of us are in constant pursuit of doing more and being more. We become frustrated at our inability to achieve perfection. But we need to stop beating up on ourselves. We’re works in progress—and that’s OK.

 

13 Signs of High Emotional Intelligence, which Dennis had shared, discusses characteristics of people who possess a high level of emotional intelligence. (Of course, I immediately started contemplating how I measure up.) Several of the traits involve the capacity to cut others some slack when they do wrong or fall short, and the article specifically calls out “empathy.”

 

Putting It All Together

 

To have empathy (a critical component of emotional intelligence), we must see some of ourselves in others. So to accept and forgive the fallibility of others, don’t we first have to accept our own faults and stop being so tough on ourselves (as Rachel suggests)?

 

We’re all human. We have all made—and will continue to make—mistakes. We have (and probably will again):

 

  • Let insensitive words leave our mouths in moments of anger or frustration.
  • Talk behind someone’s back.
  • Look for what we can gain from a situation rather than what we can do for someone else.
  • Sometimes not put our best foot forward.
  • Not tell our partner or parents or children or friends how much we love and appreciate them.
  • Tell a little white lie (or possibly even a mind-blowing whopper).
  • Snap at our kids when they ask us a question while we’re working.
  • Forget to send a birthday card.
  • Not do what we said we would.
  • Judge others when we have no clue what it’s like to be in their shoes.

 

Yeah, we slip up sometimes.

 

I do. You do. And everyone else does.

 

If we realize that doesn’t make us failures or bad people, we can all be happier, more self-confident, and more emotionally intelligent.





The Endangered Em Dash—And How You Can Help Save It.

I know it’s not nice to pick favorites, but I have. The em dash ( — ) is by far my all-time favorite piece of punctuation. It’sTwo palms of hand with the world painted on them; text at top "Save the Em Dash" versatile, adds more emphasis than parentheses and commas, and (when not overused) provides clarity and an unencumbered reading experience.

 

I revere the em dash.

 

But people are dissing it. I’m seeing more and more blog posts with two double dashes (–) as a substitute for the em dash.

 

Enough already. The em dash deserves better than that.

 

But I—sort of—understand why bloggers are doing it.

 

Adding an Em Dash Requires Effort—But So What?

 

My guess is the em dash-dissing writers are typing their posts in Google Docs or some other online word processing tool, maybe even directly in WordPress. To add a proper em dash, they would need to use the “insert symbol” function and select em dash from the available options. Unlike MS Word, those platforms don’t recognize double dashes following a letter plus a space as the signal to automatically add an em dash.

 

I understand that can be pain in the @$#. I create my drafts in Google Docs and find it annoying to have to go through the manual process of hand-picking the em dash from the special characters menu whenever I want to add one. But if that’s what it takes to add an em dash, I’m willing to do it.

 

However, not everyone shares my enthusiasm for the em dash. Fortunately for those folks, there’s an easier way.

 

The Less Cumbersome Way to Add an Em Dash in Google Docs

By going to the Tools menu and selecting Preferences, you can set up a “substitution” so that when you type a predefined letter or character combination, Google Docs will automatically substitute it with an em dash.

Drop down menu to find Preferences in Google Docs

In my Preferences, I’ve set up ++ to automatically change to an em dash. It’s less cumbersome than manually inserting the em dash symbol.

Preferences settings in Google Docs

 

It’s not without some inconvenience, though. Google Docs doesn’t recognize that it should substitute an em dash if there is a letter or character directly behind the ++. So, it requires going back to delete that unwanted space after the em dash (and to do that, you need to forward delete not backspace; otherwise, your em dash will revert to ++).  Still, I’ve found it an efficiency improvement.

You can do the same for en dashes, too. I’ve set up my preferences to make -+ become an en dash.

 

You might be thinking, “Why didn’t she use — or — as the en and em dash cues?” I admit, that does seem more logical. However, that works only if you have just an em dash preference set up. Unfortunately, things go awry when you set up both an en dash and em dash. Google Docs appears to get confused in that situation. The en dash will work just fine, but the em dash shows up as an en dash plus a single dash. Weird, I know. Anyways, because I want substitutions for both, I use -+ and ++ instead.

 

Long Live the Em Dash

Try this tip and spread the word to other bloggers who have been contributing to the demise of the em dash.

Your turn: What’s your favorite punctuation mark or punctuation pet peeve?

 





3 Ways Small Businesses Struggle With Data

Small businesses are usually strapped for resources, money and time. However, having good data can be both a lifelineAbstract bar chart with gray and black bars to represent data and a competitive advantage. Here are the top three struggles that small businesses are faced with when it comes to data.

 

Struggle #1: No time to analyze the available data

 

When you are busy serving customers at the restaurant you rarely have the time to stop and look at what menu items are popular and what are not. After all, you have ten tables that are in need of coffee refills. But if you do find an hour or two to analyze which selections are popular and which are not, you can make important changes. Analyzing orders over time can uncover new trends andall you to adapt what you’re doing so you can attract new customers and keep your existing patrons happy. An alternative to trying to carve out time to analyze your own data is to hire a professional freelance analyst who will be able to help uncover new insights for your business.

 

Struggle #2: No budget to spend on technology

 

More and more new technologies are flagging the marketplace. They can assist with anything: from the monitoring of social media to summarizing of all your digital marketing in one place. This can present challenges, not just from an integration perspective but also from a budget perspective. However, you may not need the latest technology to keep track and analyze your data. Google Sheets might do the trick. There are also other great tools that are free or close to free of charge. These tools might not have all the bells and whistles, but they work well enough with a small amount of data. A bit of research can go a long way to identify perfect tools for your business.

 

Struggle #3:  Hard time collecting data

You have probably heard that data is the business’s biggest asset. But how do you start collecting data and what data is actually useful? The answer is that data can be collected in various ways. You can observe your customers and prospects online using tools such as Google Analytics, Social Media and so on. Offline, the data may be accumulated by monitoring the types of customers and prospects that come to your store. You can also gather data by asking your prospect or customers for their names, Emails and other information that is relevant to your business. Valuable data can be collected in an online form, at a cash register or by conducting a customer survey.

You can transform struggles into opportunities with a bit of effort, a small budget and creative thinking. The first step toward turning your business into a data driven business is to start collecting data in any shape or form. The second step is to analyze the acquired data. Data analysis, in return, will provide the insights that can help drive your business forward.

Anna KayfitzAbout the Author

Anna Kayfitz is C.E.O. and founder of StrategicDB Corporation, an analytics and data cleansing company. StrategicDB Corp. helps businesses get more from their data. By analyzing sales and marketing data, you can derive tremendous value for your business. StrategicDB offers data cleansing services because no analysis is possible if you cannot trust your data. Some of our services include: segmentation modelling, dashboard building, market basket analysis, lifetime value analysis and much much more.





The Blueprint for Internet Marketing Lead Generation

Why do online efforts to generate leads and convert them into customers too often fall flat?

 

Lead generation campaigns fail to function as well as they should when some crucial element is missing—and no one notices.

 

In a sense, an Internet marketing lead generation campaign is like a jigsaw puzzle. If only a solitary piece is missing or out of place, you have no way of successfully achieving your goal. Unfortunately, with a generation campaign, you don’t have the benefit of a picture on the front of a box to guide you.

 

If your lead generation campaigns haven’t gained the results you’ve hoped for, Straight North, a Chicago-based Internet marketing firm (for whom I’m a contributing writer), has created the handy flowchart below to help you.

 

It identifies the components an effective campaign requires and how all the pieces fit together. Use it as your blueprint to solving the lead generation puzzle.

 

Infographic created by Straight North